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Communication - Japan

The mission of the Communication Working Group is to assess and restore communication in Japan's most impacted prefectures.

Working Group email address:  ***@***.***

Members

hank_test Kathy Gilbeaux mdmcdonald

Email address for group

communication-japan@m.resiliencesystem.org

Video Made Japan Tsunami 'More Real'

submitted by Samuel Bendett

by Kyle Almond - CNN - March 9, 2012

(CNN) -- One year ago, the world watched as a massive tsunami engulfed entire communities in northern Japan.

Live television footage showed waves as high as 30 feet rushing into coastal cities, tossing around boats, cars and rooftops just an hour after one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded.

"I thought Japan would disappear," one elderly survivor said in the immediate aftermath. "I thought Japan would disappear under water."

List - All Japan Resilience System Working Group Email Addresses

A list of all Japan Resilience System working group email addresses can be found below.  Also, each working group page has it's email address posted in the mission statement section (near the top of each page).

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Japanese App Helps Spread Earthquake Warning

submitted by Samuel Bendett

Homeland Security Newswire - April 27, 2011

After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan, hundreds of thousands of people have signed up for a new emergency warning app for their iPhones; when an earthquake is predicted to hit, the iPhone app, called Yure Kuru, will send out an alert and let subscribers know when the quake is coming, where the epicenter is located, and how bad the shaking will be; the app was developed by Tokyo based RC Solution Co., which specializes in mass alert systems and spreading information in the event of an emergency; since the 11 March earthquake, the company's subscribers have sky rocketed from 100,000 to more than 1.5 million

After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan leaving more than 14,000 dead and nearly 13,000 missing, hundreds of thousands of people have signed up for a new emergency warning app for their iPhones.

Twitter and Natural Disasters: Lessons from Japan

Published 18 April 2011

Researchers from Kobe City University of Foreign Studies surveyed and questioned Twitter users and tracked updates from people in the disaster-struck area on the social media site two weeks after the Tohoku earthquake and devastating tsunami of 11 March; Twitter was the only functioning communication tool immediately after the earthquake; the researchers found that there benefits for using Twitter, such as bringing information to people involved in a disaster and to those hoping to hear news; there was a downside, though: Twitter helped spread unverified rumors and misinformation, causing people to panic in areas where there was no reason to panic, thus making the work of rescuers and service authorities more difficult; one solution: have the government itself use Twitter to offer reliable information to all involved

University Of Maryland Professor Helps Digitize Disaster Relief

WAMU 88.5 News - by Sabri Ben-Achour - April 21, 2011

April 21, 2011 - The earthquake in Japan wrought massive destruction in that country, and part of the humanitarian need there -- and in any disaster -- is the need for information.

Now, a group of volunteers from around the globe, including one local professor, are working to make sure that in the future responders and refugees might help and be helped as fast as possible.

At his desk at the University of Maryland, Professor Hiroyuki Iseki has a Google map of post-earthquake Japan up on his screen. This is not just any map. One of its features is the ability to track car locations by GPS to show whether or not a road is blocked.

To do this, Iseki and his colleagues mined data from governments, businesses, and even Google Docs, to create a single digital source for that kind of information.

Disaster-Zone Phone Communication Software Available for Free

submitted by Mike Kraft

from Homeland Security Newswire

Published 14 April 2011

Australian researchers developed software which enables mobile phones to communicate during a disaster; it will be freely available to the public by the end of the year thanks to the support of the Dutch NLnet Foundation; the software can be used on compatible mobile phone handsets to create an alternative "network" where conventional mobile phone coverage has been destroyed or does not exist

Software developed by Flinders University’s Dr. Paul Gardner-Stephen which enables mobile phones to communicate during a disaster will be freely available to the public by the end of the year thanks to the support of the Dutch NLnet Foundation.

The Sevral BatPhone software can be used on compatible mobile phone handsets to create an alternative “network” where conventional mobile phone coverage has been destroyed or does not exist.

Maps - Crowd-Sourced Realtime Radiation Monitoring

There are now hundreds of radiation-related feeds from Japan on Pachube, monitoring conditions in realtime and underpinning more than half a dozen incredibly valuable applications built by people around the world. They combine 'official' data, 'unofficial' official data, and, most importantly to us, realtime networked geiger counter measurements contributed by concerned citizens.   Now we're even seeing some tracking radiation measurements of tap water.

Google Earth powered by Pachube.com

rdtn.org

Japan Geigermap


Japan Disaster Sparks Social Media Innovation

TOKYO March 31, 2011, 08:47

As Japan grapples with an unprecedented triple disaster — earthquake, tsunami, nuclear crisis — the Web has spawned creativity and innovation online amid a collective desire to ease suffering.

Once the magnitude of the March 11 disaster became clear, the online world began asking, "How can we help?"

And for that, social media offered the ideal platform for good ideas to spread quickly, supplementing efforts launched by giants like Google and Facebook.

A British teacher living in Abiko city, just east of Tokyo, is leading a volunteer team of bloggers, writers and editors producing "Quakebook," a collection of reflections, essays and images of the earthquake that will be sold in the coming days as a digital publication. Proceeds from the project will go to the Japanese Red Cross, said the 40-year-old, who goes by the pseudonym "Our Man in Abiko."

Read more...

While Electronic Communications are Down

Currently, landline, cell phones, cable, and internet are disrupted in Japan's most impacted areas.  

 

Please comment on the current situation and how the current circumstances can be improved quickly. 

howdy folks