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Innovations

The mission of the Innovations working group is explore and implement potential and actual innovative solutions for impacted communities.

Working Group email address:  ***@***.***

Members

James Miller Kathy Gilbeaux Katie Rast mdmcdonald Mika Shimizu Tomo
Yuki Karakawa

Email address for group

innovations@m.resiliencesystem.org

Japanese Build Their Own Noah’s Ark

http://video.adelaidenow.com.au/2171272222/Tsunami-escape-pods-sell-in-Japan?area=videoindex1

by Akiko Fujita - ABC News - September 30, 2011

It looks like one giant tennis ball, but a Japanese company says its yellow capsule could be the key to survival if the country gets hit by another powerful earthquake and tsunami.

Dubbing its survival shelter Noah, Cosmo Power describes it as a modern, miniature version of Noah’s Ark. The pod is large enough to hold four adults, floats in water and is made of enhanced fiberglass, which the company says is strong enough to withstand tsunamis, earthquakes, even hurricanes. Breathing holes on top and a small lookout window add to the comfort.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2011/09/japanese-build-escape-pod-noah/

Researchers Develop Controversial Earthquake Detection Network

Homeland Security Newswire - August 18, 2011

     

A QuakeFinder network installation // Source: newsvine.com

Researchers at a Silicon Valley company are hard at work developing an experimental network of electromagnetic sensors that could predict large earthquakes as much as two weeks in advance; the theory behind the research is disputed, but Tom Bleier, the inventor and chief engineer behind project QuakeFinder, hopes to prove seismologists wrong.

Researchers at a Silicon Valley company are hard at work developing an experimental network of electromagnetic sensors that could predict large earthquakes as much as two weeks in advance.

The theory behind the research is disputed, but Tom Bleier, the inventor and chief engineer behind project QuakeFinder, hopes to prove seismologists wrong. Under the project, engineers will install roughly 200 five-foot tall sensors near fault lines in California to measure changes in underground magnetic fields and to detect electrically charged particles in the air.

Earthquakes: Scientists Will Shake 5-Story Building in Japan

Homeland Security Newswire - July 29, 2011

Keri Ryan, University of Nevada, Reno civil engineering professor and lead researcher for the base isolation tests this summer at the Hyogo Earthquake Engineering Research Center in Miki, Hyogo, Japan, sits at the outdoor portion of the University of Nevada Reno large structures earthquake engineering lab where they conduct world-renowned bridge research. Photo by Mike Wolterbeek, University of Nevada, Reno.

Landmark earthquake engineering tests this summer in Japan could open the door for earthquake-proofing technology applied to hospitals, nuclear power plants, and emergency-response facilities to be more common in the United States, and confirm the capabilities for the technology used in Japan and the rest of the world

Landmark earthquake engineering tests this summer in Japan by the University of Nevada, Reno could open the door for earthquake-proofing technology applied to hospitals, nuclear power plants, and emergency-response facilities to be more common in the United States, and confirm the capabilities for the technology used in Japan and the rest of the world.

Japanese App Helps Spread Earthquake Warning

submitted by Samuel Bendett

Homeland Security Newswire - April 27, 2011

After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan, hundreds of thousands of people have signed up for a new emergency warning app for their iPhones; when an earthquake is predicted to hit, the iPhone app, called Yure Kuru, will send out an alert and let subscribers know when the quake is coming, where the epicenter is located, and how bad the shaking will be; the app was developed by Tokyo based RC Solution Co., which specializes in mass alert systems and spreading information in the event of an emergency; since the 11 March earthquake, the company's subscribers have sky rocketed from 100,000 to more than 1.5 million

After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan leaving more than 14,000 dead and nearly 13,000 missing, hundreds of thousands of people have signed up for a new emergency warning app for their iPhones.

iPhone Geiger Counter Would Benefit Japan, Needs Kickstarter Love

TUAW (The Unofficial Apple Weblog) - by Kelly Hodgkins - April 15, 2011

The folks at RDTN have organized a Kickstarter project to fund the development and deployment of radiation detectors in Japan. The project uses an iPhone hacked to work with a variety of radiation detectors. The radiation units (shown here) will be sent into the field and used to collect data on radiation contamination in the Tsunami-ravaged country.

Since the detectors use an iPhone, they are easy for the average person with minimal technical knowledge to operate. Japanese residents who accept these counters are required to take readings eight to ten times a day and report their data back to RDTN's website. The readings are compiled by RDTN and made accessible to non-profit organizations, governments and scientists. The first sensor was deployed on April 14 and is already reporting back information to RDTN. You can view these readings and additional future readings on RDTN's twitter account (@RDTNprobes).

Nuclear matters: Algae might help reduce nuclear waste


   Published 1 April 2011

The humble algae -- Closterium moniliferum -- might one day soon be used to help separate strontium from calcium in nuclear waste; if successful, the process could lead to a reduction in the amount of nuclear waste that is left over from nuclear power facilities, and might even help in cleanup when accidents occur such as the one in Chernobyl, Ukraine, that spewed great quantities of strontium into the surrounding environment

Radiation Management

Please provide innovative ideas for radiation management in comments below.

 

howdy folks